MISSOULA, Mont. -

NBC Montana was there when 25,000 plus people packed the Paul McCartney concert Tuesday night in Missoula.

Crews started breaking down the massive stage right after the concert. Those 14-semitruck loads of steel drove off Wednesday, and now workers are cleaning up the confetti and trash inside the stadium.

"The field cover comes down tomorrow and then this all gets cleaned up like there wasn't a concert here. We have football that starts September 6, and we're really excited about that," said Adams Center Executive Director Brad Murphy.

Everyone is still talking about the concert, even a day later. We headed to a local pancake shop packed with out-of-town tourists grabbing breakfast before hitting the road.

It's usually busy at Paul’s Pancake Parlor in Missoula. But this time, it’s more crowded than usual -- lines of people waiting outside and inside on a weekday. Some said they waited for more than 40 minutes to get in.

"It hasn't slowed down yesterday or today, basically just because of the Paul McCartney concert. There's a lot of people in town for that," said Manager Sam Crawshaw.

Paul McCartney fans were coming in and eating with their concert T-shirts and with a smile on their face still talking about that night.

"It was an amazing show! He did a great variety of music. I think we heard some of our favorites," said Barbie Alvestad, a Shelby resident.

"To be a part of a Beatle experience is incredible," said Huston Stolz, a Spokane, Washington, resident.

"Since we went to Paul McCartney last night, we figured Paul’s would be a good place to come and eat breakfast today," said Eric Griffin, a Helena resident.

He's been to Paul’s Pancakes before. It's one of his favorites. He traveled from Helena.

"When these artists come to Montana, we have to go and see them, regardless of where we live," said Griffin.

Crawshaw told NBC Montana that 400 to 500 people filtered in within a few hours of opening time. He knew to prepare for the week of the concert with extra staffing, but it was more than he expected.

"We didn't know quite to this magnitude, having a concert this big in town. It's like the biggest concert in Montana, from what I hear, but we could have used a little bit more help," said Crawshaw.

Regardless of the high volume, Crawshaw tells NBC Montana he's happy for the business and the fact that he is meeting and seeing fans from all over the state. He hopes that another concert like this can come to Missoula.